News & Articles from Sierra Teardrops



T@B and T@G teardrop brake requirements

FunDirectorMitch Oct-20-2017 Systems

T@B Teardrops

Our T@B trailers are more than 1500 lbs so require brakes to travel on the roads of several states including California where we are based.  They have electronic brakes which require the 7-pin connector.  The 12V power line in the 7-pin connector both powers the electronic brakes on the trailer, and provides a trickle charge to the battery while towing.  We have mounted a remote brake controller on the trailer frame, and all you need to do is plug a remote control unit into one of your tow vehicle's cigarette lighter (12V) receptacles.  This remote brake controller sets a limit on the amount of braking that will be applied.  Even without the remote controller plugged in, the brake controller on the trailer detects the braking motion and applies a smooth progressive braking action to the trailer brakes. 

Trailer brake

California, Nevada, Idaho Brake Requirements

In California, Nevada, and Idaho: brakes are required on trailers with a gross weight of 1500 lbs or more. As you can see below, these states have more strict requirements for requiring brakes on small trailers than many of the other states. 

Oregon Brake Requirements

Oregon do not specifically require trailer brakes. The vehicle and trailer must be able to stop within 25 ft from an intial speed of 20 mph on a level, dry, smooth, hard surface.

Utah, Wyoming Brake Requirements

These states do not specifically require trailer brakes. The vehicle and trailer must be able to stop within 40 ft from an intial speed of 20 mph on a level, dry, smooth, hard surface.

Washington, Arizona, Montana, Colorado Brake Requirements

These states require brakes on trailers with a gross weight of 3000 lbs or more.

 

T@G Teardrops

The short answer is that the T@G Teardrops (including the MAX XL) do not require brakes.  In any state that I am aware of after researching this.  

The long answer:

People find the specs for the T@G Max and see the GAWR listed at 2200 lbs.  Here in California (one of the most restrictive states), a camp trailer with a GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) of 1500 lbs or more must be equipped with brakes on at least 2 wheels.  GAWR is Gross Axle Weight Rating, which is obviously the rating for the axle which is NOT the same as GVW.  So if the T@G Max has an empty curb weight of 1015 lbs and you put 100 lbs of gear inside and in the clamshell kitchen, your GVW is still under 1200 lbs, which is well under the 1500 lbs point at which you need brakes.  So while the newer T@G Max models have electric brakes, they are not required on California highways.    

Note: We have adapters that convert the 7-pin connector to a 4-pin connector on tow vehicles so our T@Gs can accomodate tow vehicles with only 4-pin connectors (albeit while losing the trickle charge to the battery while towing).

Wrapup

As you can see, California, Idaho, and Nevada have more strict requirements for requiring brakes on small trailers than many of the other states surrounding them. Please consult the regulations for any state you plan on driving through.